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Electrical License Requirements in NY

Becoming a Licensed Electrician in New York

The electrician industry is on the rise, and the demand for licensed professionals along with it. There is currently a shortage of professional electricians, so the timing is perfect to get into this rewarding and lucrative career path. Here are the steps towards electrical license requirements for becoming a licensed electrician in New York State.

High School Graduation

The first step in your electrical license requirements in New York is get your high school diploma. This applies across the board, no matter what you want your career to be. A diploma is vital to your success and career path. If you have not graduated high school, whatever the reason, you still have options. If you can go back to school, do so. Otherwise, look into getting a General Equivalency Diploma, or GED. This is accepted by most apprenticeships and trade schools.

Do Your Homework

You’re looking to get a licensure in New York. This means you will want to tailor your education to those state laws. The New York City Department of Buildings website has a wealth of information on how to become a licensed Master Electrician or Special Electrician in NY. You will want to take special note of the term of your license as well as the fees involved. Specific requirements include, but are not restricted to:

  • Being 21 years of age
  • Able to read and write in English
  • Possessing good moral character
  • 5 years of experience under the supervision of a Master or Special electrician
  • Journeyman status or a college degree in electrical plus lesser experience (instead of the above)
  • Graduation from trade school or apprenticeship

School or Apprenticeship

Attending a trade or vocational school and entering an apprenticeship is vital to getting your license. Here you will learn all the tools of the trade, including mathematics, wiring and circuitry, motors, electrical theory and other skills important to the trade. You may also learn the ins and outs of the business of being an electrician, which will help you when you strike out on your own.

Generally speaking, those seeking licensure go to trade school first, and then pursue an apprenticeship. In some cases you may find an educational program that includes an apprenticeship. The process generally lasts up to five years, after which you become a Journeyman.

Taking the Test

All of the knowledge and experience you gained during your training comes together when you take the test to become a certified and licensed electrician. You will apply what you know about the National Electrical Code and all of your New York State requirements to their fullest. When you pass the test, you can apply for your license!

Of course, before you start your own business you will want to be sure you have all the necessary contractors’ insurance, such as electrical insurance. This can protect you from the legal hassles of lawsuits, workers compensation and equipment coverage, and defend against inevitable liability issues.



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Understanding Different Types of Construction Contracts

Contracts are the core, the heart and soul, of the construction industry. As a contractor, you know that these written agreements not only define the scope of services you will provide, but they allow you vital protections against lawsuits and liability issues should anything go wrong during the course of work. Construction law is difficult and complex and, it seems, ever changing. Here’s an overview of what you need to know about the different types of construction contracts.

Fixed Price and Lump Sum

There are three types of construction contracts that are most commonly used, and of these the most common is the lump sum or fixed price form of contract. With this type of contract, the property owner seeks bids from several contractors to get the best deal they can. Since with this system the entire scope of a project is presented up front, this contract is able to clearly outline the scheduling, deadlines, costs, budget and other crucial aspects of the project.

types of construction contracts

Cost Plus

Cost plus contracts are more open and freeform. They are best applied when the costs and timeframe for the project are somewhat unclear. They allow the payment to be negotiated rather than defining it as a fixed cost. It essentially agrees that the contractor will be paid for the costs of the job plus labor fees, which can be set or a percentage and may include a bonus for quick completion of the job.

Time and Material

When the overall scope and details of the project are largely or completely unknown, a time and material contract can be implemented. Whatever the variables are, if the project is nebulous, this kind of contract is an option, though it is generally the least favorable of the three types. It agrees on an hourly rate for the contractor and materials paid for by the property owner. Separate fees are negotiated for contractor profit and overhead issues.

Union Issues

If your company is a union shop, there are other considerations and guidelines you will need to follow to ensure that the job contract is in line with union requirements. There are expectations that the union will have to see fulfilled before work can commence, including conditions of employment, discrimination issues, grievance procedures and the like.

Workers

These types of construction contracts will also address the kinds of workers you will be using. Most common are subcontractors who use their own equipment and are licensed on their own. They have to be specifically accounted for within your job contract, or you could end up with liability and lawsuit issues if things go wrong.

Direct hire employees, on the other hand, work for you and your company. These employees carry fewer but different liability issues. You will have to account for payment practices, the type of work performed and working conditions when dealing with direct hires. Don’t forget to keep your company and your employees protected with workers compensation insurance.



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Certification from the Contractors State License Board

Contractors Guide to Licensing

When you set up your general contracting business, you will want to make sure that not only do you have the right liability insurance, but that you are properly certified and licensed. While the qualifications for licensing vary based on the contractors state license board where you live, there are certain universals that you will want to follow. Here is an overview of general contractor licensing and how it works from state to state.

Know Your Business

General contracting isn’t something that a person should simply jump into. It’s important to do your time in the trenches, learning the ins and outs of the business. A high school diploma or General Education Degree (GED) are vital in any case. You should then seek apprenticeships and training in your field. When you’ve spent several years in the business and have a strong handle on how general contracting works, you may be ready to approach licensing.

License Qualifications

The basic qualifications to seek a licensure for a contracting business requires that the applicant be an adult of at least 18 years of age, can read and write in English and be of good and upstanding moral character. Most states will conduct a background investigation which costs a few hundred dollars and requires the following:

  • Social Security Card
  • Photo ID
  • Proof of Residence
  • Several months’ bank statements
  • Licensure application paperwork

Some states may require additional information based on whether your business is a sole proprietor, corporation or LLC. Do your homework and investigate your home state’s requirements before getting started.

Assessment and Testing

Again, each state and type of contracting business has its own requirements, but many will require that you take an assessment exam to be sure that you know the laws surrounding the industry in your area, construction and building codes, safety procedures, OSHA requirements and the like.

As with anything important, make sure you take the time to do your homework. Look carefully into the requirements of your contractors state license board and into the specifics of what you’ll need to know to pass the assessment. Then, study hard to be sure you’re up on all the latest knowledge and information.

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License Application and Fees

When you have passed your background check and assessment exams, the time comes to get your business up and running! You will need to get proper and adequate contractors insurance to cover your activities and protect you from liability and damages. This includes both general liability insurance and workers compensation insurance. You will then need to fill out an application for your licensure and pay the licensing fees to your contractors state license board. When everything is paid up and the papers in order, you will then be issued a license that makes it legal for you to work as a general contractor in your state. Congratulations on being a licensed contractor!

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Your Guide to California Contractor License Requirements

Obtaining your contractor license in California is a little bit harder than it is in most other states. Aggravating though it may be, if you can meet the following California contractor license requirements you will not only be able to make it here, you will be able to make it anywhere. Here is what you need to know. Read more

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How to Get Your Snow Removal Contractor License in NY

Coming from Buffalo, you kind of get an understanding that snow is more than just the pretty stuff that falls around Christmas. Sure, there’s an elegance to it but you also have to respect its’ potentially destructive nature. Enough of it can cause major power outages and make roads downright dangerous, increasing the chances of potentially serious auto accidents. It is in these situations that every profession (no matter big or small) relies on snow removal contractors (and we need as many as possible in NY). Listed below is your three step guide to getting your snow removal contractor license in NY because the Empire State needs you.

Your Guide to Getting Your Snow Removal Contractor License in NY

1. Get Experience

Unlike some licenses, a degree is not required to get your snow removal contractor license in NY. Experience and skill will be favored more heavily than any degree you acquire (although a business degree may help you avoid potential pitfalls down the road). Typically, you will be required to have 1 to 3 years of experience operating snow removal vehicles before you can apply for your license and become an independent snow removal contractor. Through experience you will also get a better overview of the process, customer expectations and what skills you may need before you can open your own business.

2. Create Your Business Plan

After you have locked up your 1 to 3 years of experience you should start formulating your formal business plan. This should detail what equipment you may need, your goals and potential revenue. You should also consider what you will do for business during those months where snow does not fall.

3. Get Insured, Funded and Licensed

Your final step to obtaining your snow removal contractor license in NY may be your most complicated one. Insurance, funding and licensing will all require quite a bit of research and money. Before you open your business you will have to have enough capital to cover overhead costs (such as equipment), a viable business plan that will help a bank approve you for a business loan and enough money left over to carry insurance (especially workers comp and general liability).

Hopefully our three step guide will help you get on the fast track to obtaining your snow removal contractor license in NY. If you have any further questions about the process, or about your insurance needs, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-649-9094. We look forward to hearing from you!



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